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Books, news, and events from TIU's Rolfing Library


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Key Bible and Theological Reference Tools: Lexicons

This post is part of a series entitled Key Bible and Theological Reference ToolsThis series seeks to provide one with an introduction to some key Biblical and theological reference tools. In this series one will find basic explanations, significant examples, and other information about these reference tools.


 

Basic Description of Lexicon

A Biblical lexicon is a reference tool that provides meanings, semantic ranges, and significant uses of Biblical words in their original language. This data is organized according to an inventory of lexemes (i.e., a meaningful linguistic unit). Lexicons are particularly helpful in word studies.

TDOT & TDNT

Although not lexicons, these resources are primarily useful for conducting word studies. They provide background information and theological reflection on Biblical Hebrew and Greek words.

Lexicon Samples

HALOT by Ludwig Koehler and Walter Baumgartner (New York, NY: Brill Academic, 1994), pg. 185. * Click on photo for larger image.

BDAG by Walter Bauer and Frederick William Danker (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2000), pg. 610. * Click on photo for larger image.


* This post’s information can be found within Rolfing Library’s research guides. See the guide to Lexicons here.

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Key Bible and Theological Reference Tools: Biblical Language Grammars

This post is part of a series entitled Key Bible and Theological Reference ToolsThis series seeks to provide one with an introduction to some key Biblical and theological reference tools. In this series one will find basic explanations, significant examples, and other information about these reference tools.


Basic Description of Grammar

Biblical grammars provide grammatical and syntactical information on the Biblical languages. Not only do they serve as tools for learning the Biblical languages, but they also function as reference works for those engaging in exegesis of Biblical text in its original languages.

A Handbook to Biblical Hebrew: An Introductory Grammar by Page H. Kelley (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1994), 276-277.

Basics of New Testament Syntax: An Intermediate Greek Grammar by Daniel B. Wallace (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2000), 180-181. * Click on photo for larger image.


* This post’s information can be found within Rolfing Library’s research guides. See the guide to grammars here.


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Key Bible and Theological Reference Tools: Greek NT Eclectic Texts

This post is part of a series entitled Key Bible and Theological Reference ToolsThis series seeks to provide one with an introduction to some key Biblical and theological reference tools. In this series one will find basic explanations, significant examples, and other information about these reference tools.


Basic Description of Greek NT Eclectic Texts

The main Greek New Testament texts used in New Testament studies are eclectic. That is, their ‘finalized’ forms are compositions of various readings from a variety of manuscripts as opposed to being equivalent to one complete New Testament manuscript. Because the texts of various manuscripts differ at points (these differences are known as ‘varients’), methods are used to conclude which reading is most likely the original one. (This process of determining the most likely reading is known as ‘text criticism’).

Significant Greek NT Eclectic Texts

Novum Testamentum Graece: Nestle-Aland (e.g., NA28) – Used in Trinity courses.

The Greek New Testament by United Bible Society (UBS).

The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text.

The Textus Receptus Greek New Testament.

Helpful Resources

Greek NT Sample

Eberhard Neslte, Erwin Nestle, Barbara Aland, Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, and Bruce M. Metzger, eds., Novum Testamentum Graece: Nestle-Aland, 28th ed. (Stuttgart: German Bible Society, 2012), 298-299. * Click on photo for larger image.


* This post’s information can be found within Rolfing Library’s research guides. See the guide to Greek NT Eclectic Texts.


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Student, Meet Thesaurus Linguae Graecae

Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) is an online database of Greek texts stretching from Homer and reaching through to the Septuagint, New Testament, and early church leaders. Using TLG, you can perform various types of searches that prove useful in word studies and exegesis. In fact, many TEDS students are required to use TLG in New Testament exegesis courses. Significant benefits of using TLG in word studies include access to more comprehensive data and the ability to perform diachronic word studies in addition to synchronic word studies, e.g., limited solely to the New Testament’s use of a certain word.

You can access TLG at three computers in Rolfing Library: the two computers across from the reference desk and the computer across from the scanning station, next to the microfilm reader.

Once in TLG, you can perform searches by author, date, source, word (and lemma), or a combinations of these. And within lemma searches, you can even specify the search according to morphology (exciting, I know!).

Results of a search look something like this, with author, source (with locations), date, and some context provided:

TLG Sample Search Results

Many students use the LOEB Classical Library in conjunction with their findings. With the locations provided by TLG (e.g., book and line), you can easily locate these passages in the appropriate LOEB work. The LOEB collection can be found in the reference section (Ref. PA3611 .A14 1931 — Ref. PA 6156 .V6 A26x 2000).

Rolfing’s website also contains helpful tutorials for using TLG. And if you need further personal assistance, just come visit us over at reference! We’d be glad to help!

Kirk Miller is a Reference Assistant at Rolfing Library. You can contact Kirk and our entire reference staff at libref@tiu.edu.